Shooting Modes on Sony Alpha a5100

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Although there may not be the usual dial for switching between shooting modes on the Sony Alpha a5100, rest assured the camera includes all the usual shooting modes plus some useful additions. Here are the available shooting modes with descriptions and best use cases for each on the Sony Alpha a5100. To switch between shooting modes, press the Select button in the middle of the control wheel at the back of your camera when the camera is turned on, use the scroll wheel to select a mode, then press the Select button to switch to that mode. The available shooting modes are: Intelligent Auto (i) Intelligent Auto mode will automatically detect the type of scene you are shooting and adjust accordingly. Once detected, an icon for the recognized scene will appear in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Useful for: all-around shooting when you want to simply snap off some photos, with less emphasis on composing a specific desired shot. Superior Auto (i+) Superior Auto goes beyond scene type detection, including composite layering for higher dynamic range. Available only when shooting JPEG only. Useful for: Similar situation as Intelligent Auto, but when the scenes you are shooting include a wide range of exposure, such as shooting into or out of shadow. Program Auto (P) In Program, the camera automatically sets the shutter speed and aperture, leaving the exposure adjustments left to you. Useful for: intentionally creating under or overexposed photos. Aperture Priority (A) Aperture Priority gives you manual control of the aperture of your camera …

Drive Modes on Sony Alpha a5100

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A camera’s Drive is how your camera functions when taking photos. Different drive modes cause the camera to take photos in different ways based on your needs. The Sony Alpha a5100 is equipped with several different drive modes. Here are all the drive modes available on the a5100 and the best use for each. Single In Single drive mode, your camera will take one photo with every shutter button press. This is the default drive mode. Useful for: Most situations. Continuous Continuous drive can be set at High speed or Low speed, and will continue taking photos as long as the shutter button is pressed. High speed Continuous will take photos at a faster rate, and Low speed will take photos at a slower rate. Useful for: Taking photos of fast moving objects, when quick changes might happen, or in any situation where a quick sequence of images is useful (such as facial expressions or reactions). Self Timer Self Timer mode can be set at 2 Seconds or 10 Seconds, and after pressing the shutter button, will take a photo after the amount of time you have selected. Useful for: When you need to get into the shot yourself, or before very long exposure photos for maximum camera stability. Self Timer Continuous Self Timer Continuous mode can be set to 10 Second/3 Shot or 10 Second/5 Shot, and till take a sequence of (the set number of) images after ten seconds. Useful for: Group photos, so that you can pick the perfect photo after the fact. …

Flash Modes & Options on Sony Alpha a5100

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Light is the single most important aspect of taking photos, and most every camera comes with a ton of options to adjust how the camera uses and adjusts to light. This article describes the flash modes and options related to using flash on your Sony Alpha a5100. Although many advanced flash photography techniques are beyond the scope for this camera, the Sony a5100 still has plenty of options that enhance the use of the built in pop-up flash. There are several flash modes on the a5100, and until the popup flash is opened, the default mode is off. Once you click the Flash button on the left-hand side at the top of the camera, the flash will pop up and into position, and the flash mode is switched to Auto. There are several flash modes: Autoflash Autoflash is the default flash mode with the popup flash opened. Auto mode will fire a preliminary flash before taking a photo to determine how much flash and how to adjust any other automatic settings (based on your shooting mode). Fill-flash Fill flash mode will sync the timing of the flash with the front (or first) shutter curtain. This is the default firing time for most camera flash units. When used with very slow shutter speeds, Fill flash will create streaks of color in front of moving objects, as there is more exposure at the beginning of the open shutter. Slow Sync Slow sync fires the flash at the beginning curtain like fill-flash mode, but will tell the camera to …