BTL: Sun Starburst Effect Wedding Party Portrait

In Photography by Jerad HillLeave a Comment

In our fantastic Facebook Group, a question was asked about how you can exaggerate the sun coming through the trees. This came at a perfect time because I had just photographed a wedding where I had the sun shining through the trees to create a natural sun starburst effect. Not all camera settings are created equal when it comes to trying to capture the sun in this way. It also becomes challenging to capture a sun starburst while at the same time, keeping your subjects in the foreground exposed properly. As you can see in this image, I probably could have used a bit more light on my subjects but overall the photo turned out pretty good. Due to the excessive amount of light coming through the tree, there is some degradation in the finer details of the leafs of the tree. If you don’t zoom in on the photo, you probably won’t notice. Most tutorials online will suggest that you need to close down your aperture to something like fstop 18 or even 22 to achieve this effect. As you can see, my aperture was set to 6.3. I was able to achieve the sun starburst effect because the sun was so overpowering and because my focal length was so wide. This is also why I decided to have the sun backlight my subjects. If the sun was behind me, lighting the front of my subjects, they would have barely been able to keep their eyes open. I would rather combat strong backlighting than force my subjects …

BTL: My Son on the Dock in Newport Beach

In Photography by Jerad HillLeave a Comment

This is one of my favorite photos I have taken of my second child. I captured this photo while we were on vacation in Newport Beach in 2013. He was 17 months old at this time. He was sitting on the steps of the dock and I just happened to have my camera in hand. I walked right up to him and said, “hey buddy.” He looked up at me, smiled and I took the photo. The sun was low as it was less than 30 minutes from sunset. The sunset was actually behind me but it was blocked by houses. To compensate for the fact that the sun was not out and shining at that point, I increased my ISO and opened the aperture wide. This also gave the photo a nice shallow depth of field, which I believe helps draw your eyes to him. A shallow depth of field puts everything in the background out of focus. You can see that in this photo, though the furthest point of the background is not far away, it is out of focus. I made sure to quickly focus on his eyes using back button focus rather than allowing my camera to focus as I pressed the shutter down (I will post a tutorial on back button focus soon). I have missed focus so many times by allowing the camera to focus as I press down the shutter button, especially when I needed to capture the photo fast before the moment had passed. I kept the shutter speed …